Models > GFSS2HCYCSS

GFSS2HCYCSS General Electric Refrigerator

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Manuals & Guides for GFSS2HCYCSS

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The temperature sensor, also referred to as a thermistor, is used to monitor the refrigerator and freezer internal temperatures. The sensor is a small capsule like device that is protected by a white ...
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If your freezer has a buildup of frost, or is not maintaining the proper temperature, there may be an issue with the defrost thermostat. This device stops the evaporator coil from overheating while th...
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The ice maker assembly makes ice by filling the tray with water from the inlet valve, freezing it until solid cubes are formed, and then ejecting them into the ice bucket. This process will repeat unt...
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The crisper drawer in your refrigerator is designed to keep either a low or high humidity environment for storing your produce. If the drawer has become cracked or damaged, it should be replaced so th...
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$8.42
The light switch in your refrigerator is used to turn the light on and off when the fridge door opens or closes. This is considered a closed switch, which means that when the fridge door depresses the...
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This OEM compression ring is used to hold the evaporator fan motor in place. Signs that you may need to replace the compression ring are if the fan is noisy, or your fridge or freezer are too warm. We...
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This 40-Watt light bulb is sold individually and is a genuine OEM replacement option for your home appliances. It is specially designed to withstand extreme temperatures, so this bulb is compatible wi...
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$10.97
This genuine OEM replacement part is a bumper for your refrigerator. The bumper is made of orange rubber and measures less than half an inch in diameter. The bumper is used to prevent the fan motor fr...
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$56.27
This part helps the compressor kick on and off while maintaining a constant temperature to keep things frozen in your freezer. This part has been updated by the manufacturer and may appear different t...
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This evaporator fan blade is for your refrigerator, and it circulates air so that the temperature of the fridge is regulated. This model has 3 blades, and is a little more than 4 inches in diameter. I...
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This part is a replacement light socket for your refrigerator. It connects to the power source, and holds the light bulb. If the light in your refrigerator is not working, you could have a faulty sock...
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This is a replacement evaporator fan grommet for your refrigerator. The fan grommet absorbs the vibration from the evaporator fan motor for quiet operation while it runs. If your evaporator fan is unu...
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Tim
April 25, 2023
Have temp set at 2 for freezer and 2 set for fresh food . Fresh food is to cold . Settings before I changed water supply solenoid was 6 and 5 . Ice maker works great but fridg is running cold . Tested both thermistors and they are good . Could temperature control board not working correctly? It works somewhat cause I can effect temps by pushing temp buttons . Thanks Tim
For model number GFSS2HCYCSS
Hi Tim, thank you for reaching out. Since you have already tested the thermistors, we would recommend checking the temperature control board, part number FIX2371151, and replacing it if necessary. We hope this solves your problem!

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Common Problems and Symptoms for GFSS2HCYCSS

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Fridge too warm
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Freezer section too warm
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Freezer not defrosting
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Ice maker not making ice
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Light not working
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Noisy
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Fridge too cold
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Frost buildup
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Fridge and Freezer are too warm
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Too warm
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Will Not Start
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Freezer too cold
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Fridge runs too long
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Leaking
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Ice maker won’t dispense ice
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Door won’t open or close
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Clicking sound
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Doesn’t stop running
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Not dispensing water
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Ice maker dispenses too little ice
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Ice maker dispenses too much ice
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Too cold
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Won’t start
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Door Sweating
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Keep searches simple. Use keywords, e.g. "leaking", "pump", "broken" or "fit".
  • Customer:
    Mike from Scottsdale, AZ
  • Parts Used:
    WR50X10068, WR55X10025
  • Difficulty Level:
    Easy
  • Total Repair Time:
    15 - 30 mins
  • Tools:
    Nutdriver, Screw drivers
Freezer wouldn't maintain temperature ... got warm.
The freezer in my side-by-side kept warming up -- often 20 degrees or more, which of course caused the fresh food side to warm up also. I do a lot of jump-in-with-both-feet home repairs, but never on a large appliance. Not having an ohmmeter, which cost about $100 for a reliable one, I took the symptoms to the internet. Countless self-help sites and U-Tube videos later, I was positive it was one of two possible problems, either the defrost thermostat was broken and the defroster wasn't coming out of its cycle or the temperature sensor wasn't reading the correct temp and thus kicking in the fan motor when needed. Fortunately I found both parts easily on PartSelect.com and the total cost for both, including shipping, was $30, less than 1/3 of the cost of an ohmmeter. Not knowing for sure which part it was that was bad, I ordered both, figuring, since I had to pull out the panel anyway, I might just as well replace them both ... the price was right. (In retrospect I should have order 4 Temperature Sensors as my fridge has two in both the freezer side and the Fresh Food side. Any one of them being bad could have caused the same problem. Fortunately, I was lucky because it was either ONLY the Defrost Thermostat or I just happened to pick the right Sensor, but the repair worked.)

The repair was easy: Unplug the power. A Nut Driver removed the four screws holding on the panel in the back of the freezer. A screw driver removes the one screw holding the lamp cover in place. Remove the light bulbs, pull off the panel and right above the freezer coils you'll see both parts -- plain as day. (If your coils are clogged with ice, you will probably need de-ice first.) Cut the wires to both parts as close to the parts as you can to leave as much wire exposed as possible. Strip the ends of all four wires about 1/2 inch and also on the new parts. Match up the wires in the fridge to the wires on the parts and twist the ends together (Note: both wires on the Sensor are white so they match up either way, but the two wire on the thermostat will need to match up orange to orange and pink to pink.) I used silicone filled wire nuts, which you can buy at any hardware store or use your own wing nuts and fill them with silicone or shoe goo which works just as well ... anything to keep the moisture out and prevent the wires ends from corroding. Tuck the wires up and replace the panel, light bulbs and light cover That's it. Very easy. By far the hardest part was wedging my wide body into the narrow freezer compartment. Some one-handed work added a little extra time to the project.

In my case the freezer fan didn't kick in for about twenty minutes after I plugged it back in, but I assume that it either begins in the defrost mode or it takes that long for it to reset itself ... either way the repair worked great.
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  • Customer:
    michele from North Smithfield, RI
  • Parts Used:
    WR55X10025
  • Difficulty Level:
    Really Easy
  • Total Repair Time:
    15 - 30 mins
  • Tools:
    Pliers
my refigerator was warm but the freezer was cold and working correcttly
I went to a GE repair center to explain my problem, the service center reccomended that I have a techinician come out o look at it. $75.00 for the visit and what ever labor and materials wuld cost.

I went on line to see if there were others having this same problem and found that there were many with the same problem.

After reading some of the ways that people found out what was wrong ...it became a matter of three components, the timer, heater or thermostat.

I tried the most common component and the less expensive one first , the thermostat switch I installed it very easily snipping two wires and attaching the news using wire nuts I used the diagram on this website to pinpoint the component and there has not been a problem since.
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  • Customer:
    Christian from Kearneysville, WV
  • Parts Used:
    WR55X24064, WR2X9391
  • Difficulty Level:
    Really Easy
  • Total Repair Time:
    Less than 15 mins
  • Tools:
    Screw drivers
No power to the fan and compressor
I have a fridge in my garage. I have found that a glass of ice water or a cold drink outside is very important to me. When I discovered melting ice dripping onto the garage floor I was very upset. I spun the fridge and found that the compressor and fan weren't starting. I got out my multi-meter and discovered that power was not making it to these components. I did some research and found the wiring diagram online. There really isn't too much going on with a fridge and the most likely candidate seemed to be the run capacitor. I ordered the part, replaced it in a few minutes and the fridge began working again.
222 of 295 people found this instruction helpful.
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